play_circle

For a better listening experience, download the Newslaundry app

App Store
Play Store

Let’s Talk About: Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh, Ep 2

The post-Partition years, the gradual expansion, and the transition from Golwalkar to Deoras.

ByNL Team
    bookmark_add 
  • whatsapp
  • copy

In episode 1 of this three-part series, we left off in 1947. India was coming to terms with the horrors of Partition and communal faultlines were deepening. Across the political spectrum, leaders were battling disenchantment among their followers, and the RSS was no exception.

But its work during Partition stood it in good stead, and Golwalkar hoped to further expand the organisation.

Then came the assassination of Mahatma Gandhi, and the goodwill generated by the RSS came crumbling down.

How did the RSS pick itself up and what were its primary motivations at the time? What is the truth behind the conflicting narratives on Godse’s ties to the Sangh? And what changed between the Golwalkar years and the Deoras years that followed?

Featuring guest panellists like Hartosh Singh Bal, Walter K Andersen and Arun Anand, this episode also breaks down the Sangh’s organisational structure and how it functions. How has it managed to permeate into so many spheres of social engagement?

All this and more in the second episode. Listen.

subscription image

Continue reading this story for free


Why should I pay for news?

Independent journalism is not possible until you pitch in. We have seen what happens in ad-funded models: Journalism takes a backseat and gets sacrificed at the altar of clicks and TRPs.

Stories like these these cost perseverance, time, and resources. Subscribe now to power our journalism.


  • Access to paywall stories
  • Access to NL Chatbox
  • Access to our subscriber-only Discord server
  • Access to subscriber-only events, including The Media Rumble and NL Recess
  • Access to podcast RSS links to listen to our paywall podcasts in apps like Apple and Google Podcasts
  • Access to NL Baithak


Post your free trial, you’ll be charged ₹300 per month

Already a subscriber? Login

You may also like